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With Dostoevsky there is no heights, no mountains, there is no divine perspective, everything is in the human domain, wreathed in this characteristically Dostoevskian wretched, dirty, sick, almost contaminated mood that is never too far from hysteria. That is where the light is. That is where the divine stirs.
Karl Ove Knausgaard, My Struggle, Vol. 2 (via girlfriendontherun)

(via dostoyevsky)

Feb 27, 2014 / 70 notes
Feb 10, 2014 / 5 notes
kunigunde:

Soviet-era statue called “The Diver” with a garland of fall leaves in Gorky Park. Moscow, October 8, 2011
(Photo by Sergei Karpukhin)
Feb 8, 2014 / 11 notes

kunigunde:

Soviet-era statue called “The Diver” with a garland of fall leaves in Gorky Park. Moscow, October 8, 2011

(Photo by Sergei Karpukhin)

(via inlovewithrussia-deactivated201)

Feb 8, 2014 / 46 notes
Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can’t, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.
Robert Frost (via observando)

(via lovelyydarkanddeep)

Feb 8, 2014 / 5,320 notes
Feb 5, 2014 / 31 notes

(via lemotjuste)

Feb 4, 2014 / 240 notes

usnatarchives:

The Emancipation Proclamation will be on display for just three days this month: February 15, 16, and 17.

Due to its fragile condition, it can only be displayed for a limited time each year. The document will be on display in the new David M. Rubenstein Gallery in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.

You can read the transcription, or download “The Meaning and Making of Emancipation,” a free eBook created by the National Archives for your iPad, iPhone, Nook, or other electronic device.

(via smithsonianlibraries)

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

By Well-Lettered
Feb 4, 2014 / 10 notes

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

By Well-Lettered

Well-Lettered || www.etsy.com/shop/welllettered
Feb 3, 2014
Feb 3, 2014
Feb 3, 2014
Well-Lettered || www.etsy.com/shop/welllettered
Feb 3, 2014 / 18 notes
Feb 3, 2014
Feb 3, 2014 / 1 note

Man is fond of counting his troubles, but he does not count his joys. If he counted them up as he ought to, he would see that every lot has enough happiness provided for it.

FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY

Feb 2, 2014 / 49 notes